Category Archives: History

Traces: Representations of the Holocaust and Antisemitism in British Film and Television

Research, Educate, Engage

Traces: Representations of the Holocaust and Antisemitism in British Film and Television

In collaboration with the British Jewish Contemporary Cultures Network and supported by Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image

Speakers: Nathan Abrams, Bangor University; James Jordan, University of Southampton; Caroline Kaye, University of Manchester; Sue Vice, University of Sheffield.
Date: Wednesday 8 November 2017
Time: 12.00 noon – 5.00 pm
Venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1E 0PD.
Event open to all: Registration fee: £5.00 for students and unwaged and £10.00 for all other attendees. A light lunch will be provided. Book your place.
The representation of the Holocaust and antisemitism in British film and television has been relatively overlooked. This illustrated workshop attempts to address this gap by screening and discussing a range of texts that examine memories of the Holocaust and antisemitism in Britain in a variety of forms. Some of these texts are explicit in their representations, others are works that make no extant claim to represent it. They include the British television drama Twist of Fate (1989), the 1973 horror film, The Wicker Man and the work of director Stanley Kubrick. Taking these texts as a starting point for discussion, this workshop presents a timely intervention into current debates about the Holocaust and antisemitism within British media and culture.

 

Papers:

  • ‘Life Functions Terminated’: Stanley Kubrick, IBM and the Holocaust, Nathan Abrams, Bangor University
  • The Ghetto and the Camp: a consideration of BBC Television’s Representation of the Holocaust in the 1960s, James Jordan, University of Southampton
  • The Wicker Man (1973): Film Reflecting the Holocaust, Caroline Kaye, Manchester Metropolitan University
  • Twist of Fate (BBC 1989): The Holocaust Survivor Who is Really a Perpetrator, Sue Vice, University of Sheffield

Click here for further information.

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The Battle of Cable Street is brought up in response to Trump in @onthemedia For Antifa, Not All Speech Should Be Free via @WNYC

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R.I.P. Zygmunt Bauman

He’s not a literary author, but has been a enormous influence for critics and authors in the world of Anglo-Jewish writing (and far beyond–I just bought a book of his in Phoenix, AZ) that it is worth linking to him here.

Bauman Institute
Wikipedia Page (apparently there are issues with it.  Can you fix them?)  (Or tell me and I will make the chages.)

Obituaries:
Al Jazeera
The Guardian
Washington Post
BBC
Times Higher Education
The Times
Jewish Telegraphic Agency

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New Book: Three-Way Street: Jews, Germans, and the Transnational

three-way-streetReally interested in seeing this.

Jay Howard Geller and Leslie Morris, Editors

As German Jews emigrated in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and as exiles from Nazi Germany, they carried the traditions, culture, and particular prejudices of their home with them. At the same time, Germany—and Berlin in particular—attracted both secular and religious Jewish scholars from eastern Europe. They engaged in vital intellectual exchange with German Jewry, although their cultural and religious practices differed greatly, and they absorbed many cultural practices that they brought back to Warsaw or took with them to New York and Tel Aviv. After the Holocaust, German Jews and non-German Jews educated in Germany were forced to reevaluate their essential relationship with Germany and Germanness as well as their notions of Jewish life outside of Germany.

Among the first volumes to focus on German-Jewish transnationalism, this interdisciplinary collection spans the fields of history, literature, film, theater, architecture, philosophy, and theology as it examines the lives of significant emigrants. The individuals whose stories are reevaluated include German Jews Ernst Lubitsch, David Einhorn, and Gershom Scholem, the architect Fritz Nathan and filmmaker Helmar Lerski; and eastern European Jews David Bergelson, Der Nister, Jacob Katz, Joseph Soloveitchik, and Abraham Joshua Heschel—figures not normally associated with Germany. Three-Way Street addresses the gap in the scholarly literature as it opens up critical ways of approaching Jewish culture not only in Germany, but also in other locations, from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

“A much-needed, original analytic approach that helps reframe conventional studies of German-Jewish history. Beyond merely comparing German-Jewish culture to Jewish culture elsewhere, it combines cutting-edge research with fresh readings of well-known works and sites viewed through an effective transnational lens. As a result, the book offers important new insight into German Jewish experiences through smart essays on a range of subjects including architecture, literature, film, photography, and history.”
—Lisa Silverman, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Jay Howard Geller is Samuel Rosenthal Professor of Judaic Studies and Associate Professor of History at Case Western Reserve University.

Leslie Morris is Associate Professor of German at the University of Minnesota.

http://www.press.umich.edu/9221214/three_way_street

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Which is the Merchant Here?

Look out for Which is the Merchant Here? On the Myth of the Medieval Jewish Moneylender by Julie Mell.

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Links to Articles about Chimen Abramsky and The House of 20,000 Books

Halban – UK Publisher
Obituaries:
Reviews of this Book
Sasha Abramsky speaking about the book  The House of Twenty Thousand Books:
Sasha’s Articles about his Grandfather:
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Sasha Abramsky, The House of Twenty Thousand Books, in conversation with Jeremy Solomons

The House of Twenty Thousand Books is journalist Sasha Abramsky’s elegy to the vanished intellectual world of his grandparents, Chimen and Miriam, and their vast library of socialist literature and Jewish history. A rare book dealer and self-educated polymath who would go on to teach at Oxford and consult for Sotheby’s, Chimen Abramsky drew great writers and thinkers like Isaiah Berlin and Eric Hobsbawm to his north London home; his library grew from his abiding passion for books and his search for an enduring ideology. The books, documents, and manuscripts that covered every shelf at 5 Hillway were testaments to Chimen’s quest — from the Jewish orthodoxy of his boyhood, to the Communism of his youth, to the liberalism of his mature years. The House of Twenty Thousand Books is at once the story of a fascinating family and chronicle of the embattled twentieth century.

Sasha Abramsky is the author of Conned: How Millions Went to Prison, Lost the Vote, and Helped Send George W. Bush to the White House, and has reported on U.S. prisons for Human Rights Watch. He lives in Sacramento, California.

Jeremy Solomons is a PhD candidate in English Literature at the University of Reading, U.K., and Scholar in Residence at the Elie Wiesel Center for Jewish Studies at Boston University, U.S.A. His topic is Post World War 2 Anglo-Jewish drama. He has studied theatre with Augusto Boal (Theatre of the Oppressed) and Keith Johnstone (Impro). After 15 years working full-time in professional theatre on the production side, he founded youth theatres in England writing and directing over 20 productions. Since then he has been a bookstore manager, taught writing, literature, and drama at colleges, in the U.K. and New England, where he lives in Brookline, MA with his wife and they have two college age sons.

These days, alongside doing research, he teaches, writes and helps people with web, written, and spoken communication using his drama and improvisation experience and does project management for various organizations and businesses.

Event date:

Thursday, October 15, 2015 – 7:00pm

Event address:

Porter Square Books
25 White St.
Cambridge, MA 02140
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Rough Guide Sums Up Golders Green

Rough Guide Golder Green

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Exhibition in tel Aviv: Looking to the North and West – From the East End to Golders Green

“London is a modern Babylon.” (Benjamin Disraeli, British Prime Minister, 1847)

Curators: Avichai Halperin | Asaf Galay

“I look at Whitechapel and think to myself: if London is so cheerful, how will it be in America?!”

(Sholem Aleichem, “Motle son of Peisi”)

In the late nineteenth century, the dream of a different and better life led millions of Jews to emigrate from Eastern Europe to the New World. London, which in many cases was the last stop before their longed-for destination…Read more http://www.bh.org.il/event/london/

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IN SEARCH OF THE LOST JEWS OF MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

So the author Stefan Zweig and Charles Steinmetz, the hunchbacked dwarf mathematician, were walking through Vienna at the end of the 19th century. As they passed a synagogue Zweig said, “I used to be a Jew,” to which Steinmetz replied, “I used to be a hunchback.”

Read artilce here in the wonderful new on-line literary journal Lit Hub 

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