Category Archives: BJCC – British Jewish Contemporary Culture

Traces: Representations of the Holocaust and Antisemitism in British Film and Television

Research, Educate, Engage

Traces: Representations of the Holocaust and Antisemitism in British Film and Television

In collaboration with the British Jewish Contemporary Cultures Network and supported by Birkbeck Institute for the Moving Image

Speakers: Nathan Abrams, Bangor University; James Jordan, University of Southampton; Caroline Kaye, University of Manchester; Sue Vice, University of Sheffield.
Date: Wednesday 8 November 2017
Time: 12.00 noon – 5.00 pm
Venue: Birkbeck, University of London, Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1E 0PD.
Event open to all: Registration fee: £5.00 for students and unwaged and £10.00 for all other attendees. A light lunch will be provided. Book your place.
The representation of the Holocaust and antisemitism in British film and television has been relatively overlooked. This illustrated workshop attempts to address this gap by screening and discussing a range of texts that examine memories of the Holocaust and antisemitism in Britain in a variety of forms. Some of these texts are explicit in their representations, others are works that make no extant claim to represent it. They include the British television drama Twist of Fate (1989), the 1973 horror film, The Wicker Man and the work of director Stanley Kubrick. Taking these texts as a starting point for discussion, this workshop presents a timely intervention into current debates about the Holocaust and antisemitism within British media and culture.

 

Papers:

  • ‘Life Functions Terminated’: Stanley Kubrick, IBM and the Holocaust, Nathan Abrams, Bangor University
  • The Ghetto and the Camp: a consideration of BBC Television’s Representation of the Holocaust in the 1960s, James Jordan, University of Southampton
  • The Wicker Man (1973): Film Reflecting the Holocaust, Caroline Kaye, Manchester Metropolitan University
  • Twist of Fate (BBC 1989): The Holocaust Survivor Who is Really a Perpetrator, Sue Vice, University of Sheffield

Click here for further information.

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“The Promised Land” Open University, London, 23rd July 2015

http://bjcc.bangor.ac.uk/past-events.php.en

Papers given:

  • ‘Tragedy or Neutropia? The Honourable Woman’
    Dr. Sue Vice, University of Sheffield
  • ‘British-Jewish Utopias and Dystopias from Zangwill to Jacobson’
    Professor Brian Cheyette, University of Reading
  • “No Outlines”: From Dystopia to Heterotopia in Howard Jacobson’s J’
    Dr. Ruth Gilbert, University of Winchester
  • ‘Messianism and British-Jewish Utopia’
    Dr. Peter Lawson, Open University
  • ‘The Future is Orange: Utopia and Dystopia in the Films of Stanley Kubrick’
    Dr. Nathan Abrams, Bangor University
  • ‘No Promised Land: A. C. Jacobs’ Poetry and the “Moment” of Diaspora’
    Dr. Merle Bachman, Spalding University
  • ‘East, North and West End: The Promised Land across London in the Plays of Bernard Kops’
    Mr. Jeremy Solomons, Boston University & University of Reading
  • Reading from her memoir “Losing Israel”
    Jasmine Donohaye, Swansea University
  • ‘The Idea of Jewish Racial Space: Zionist Utopia in the Anglo-Jewish Imagination’
    Professor Gavin Schaffer, University of Birmingham
  • ‘Jewtopia: Herbert Samuel, Rewriting Bacon’s New Atlantis, and Zionism’
    Dr. Finn Fordham, Royal Holloway University of London
  • ‘Skin: a Metafictional Investigation into Jewish “Blackness” from Chamberlain’s and Pierce’s Racism to its Deconstruction in Modern British Film’
    Dr. Federico Dal Bo, ICI Berlin
  • Paper Title: ‘Michael Moorcock’s Pyat Quartet, Twentieth-Century History, and the Failure of the Utopian’
    Dr. Eric Sandberg, University of Oulu
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Writing Jews in Contemporary Britain Workshop from September 11, 2013

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Link to Conference Information

From the English at Reading Blog  “A unique workshop entitled ‘Writing Jews in Contemporary Britain’.  Hosted by the Pears Institute at Birkbeck College, University of London, the workshop comprised three panels (two on literature, one on film and television) that covered subjects ranging from the importance of Hendon in contemporary British-Jewish fiction, to the Jewishness of Dr Who (who knew?!).”

Podcasts of the workshop are available:

Dr. Nadia Valman – Anglo-Jewish Literature and the Poetics of  Place

Dr. Ruth Gilbert    – Genes, Shmenes’: Jew-ish Identities in Contemporary British Jewish Writing

Dr. James Jordan  – Either/Neither or a Bit of Both: The Wandering View of British Television’s Image of the Jew

Dr. Nathan Adams – Lolita’s Hidden Heart of Jewishness

Dr. David Brauner – Fetishizing the Holocaust:Transatlantic Connections and Satirical Comedy in Howard Jacobson’s Kalooki Nights

Dr. Bryan Cheyette – British-Jewish Writing and the Challenge of Metaphorical Thinking

Text from pears Institute website:

The workshop’s emphasis is on new and innovative work being undertaken in the field and is intended to provide a forum for presenting and analysing the most recent critical and theoretical approaches to British-Jewish fiction, film, television drama and documentary.

Through the workshop we hope to explore, among other topics, the representation of ‘hyphenated’ British and Jewish identities; the recent history and current state of British-Jewish literary and visual culture; and the relation of that culture to the mainstream in Britain. The seminar will also consider British-Jewish culture in the light of postcolonial thinking and in comparison to the development of Jewish culture in the USA.

Programme

Introduction

David Feldman, Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

Session 1: Post-War British-Jewish Fiction

  • Nadia Valman  – Anglo-Jewish Literature and the Poetics of  Place
  • Ruth Gilbert  – ‘Genes, Shmenes’: Jew-ish Identities in Contemporary British Jewish Writing

Session 2: British-Jewish Film and Television

  • Nathan Abrams – Lolita’s Hidden Heart of Jewishness
  • James Jordan – Either/Neither or a Bit of Both: The Wandering View of British Television’s Image of the Jew

Session 3: British-Jewish Writing in Relation to Anglophone and World Jewish Literary Production

  • David Brauner – Fetishizing the Holocaust:Transatlantic Connections and Satirical Comedy in Howard Jacobson’s Kalooki Nights
  • Bryan Cheyette – British-Jewish Writing and the Challenge of Metaphorical Thinking

Closing Remarks

Axel Stähler, University of Kent and Sue Vice, University of Sheffield

Seminar co-convenors
David Feldman, Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism
Axel Stähler, University of Kent
Sue Vice, University of Sheffield

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